(Grayleaf Willow)

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Salix glauca, Pistillate Catkins, Loveland Pass, Clear Creek Co. 7103

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Salix glauca, Pistillate Catkins, Loveland Pass, Clear Creek Co. 6798

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Salix glauca, Loveland Pass, Clear Creek Co. 7083

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Salix glauca, upper leaf surface, Loveland Pass, Clear Creek Co. 6811

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Salix glauca, lower leaf surface, Loveland Pass, Clear Creek Co. 6813

Scientific Name Salix glauca USDA Plants Symbol SAGL
Common Name Grayleaf Willow ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 22482
Family Salicaceae (Willow) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Montane and alpine (7500 to 13500 ft.); well-drained soils in open areas.
Plant: Erect shrub generally 3 to 4 feet tall; taller in favorable sites, but much shorter on exposed tundra sites; overall grayish-green appearance; branches brownish to red-brown; new twigs red- to yellow-brown and sparsely to densely hairy.
Leaves: Elliptic, oblanceolate or obovate-shaped, 1 to 3.4 inches long and 0.4 to 1.5 inches wide; upper surface shiny, long soft-hairy to nearly smooth, lower surface with a bluish-white, waxy coating and woolly or silky hairs often becoming nearly smooth; entire edges; yellowish petioles 0.4 inch long or less.
Inflorescence: Female (pistillate) catkins 0.8 to 2 inches long; male (staminate) catkins 0.5 to 1.3 inches long; bracts below are brownish to green.
Bloom Period: May to July.
References: "Flora of Colorado" by Jennifer Ackerfield, US Forest Service, E-Flora BC and SEINet.
Note: Willow species are difficult to differentiate and there may be errors in the IDs on these images. If you see an error, please let me know.
BONAP Distribution Map

Colorado Status:
Native

© Tom Lebsack 2022

Banner photo: Ten Mile Range and Rhodiola integrifolia (King’s Crown) in Summit County